The Most Famous Races to Ever Take Place for NASCAR at Talladega

Much like any other professional sport, stock car racing has had its fair share of notable and famous races, down-to-the-line finishes that etched their way into NASCAR history. With so many races taking place each year on the pro circuit, easily there are some that can be deemed as more memorable than others. In this post, we will briefly review some of the most famous stock car racing events that ever took place at one of NASCAR’s most famous race tracks: Talladega.

The first stock car racing Event at Talladega: The three Richards – This one easily has earned its place in stock car racing history. Richard Petty was not deterred from putting his roadster on the tracks of Talladega for the inaugural race, even after many NASCAR drivers refused to do so over fears that they wouldn’t have enough tire grip. Notable other drivers who choose to race that day included Richard Childress and Richard Brickhouse, of which Brickhouse earned the win that day, all the way back in 1969.

In 1973, during the 500 event at Talladega – considered by many to be the “Big One” because 60 cars were on the track – a backstretch accident wiped out 21 cars, and another mishap wrecked an additional 19. By the time the race was concluded, there were only 17 cars that were still in the race and in contention. It represented a race that had more wrecked cars than almost any other race in stock car racing history.

Wrangler takes Dale Earnhardt to the top. When Earnhardt and Childress started working together again, Earnhardt made sure to bring along his Wrangler sponsorship.  Earnhardt etched a win by famously passing up Terry Labonte in the final lap at the 1984 Talladega 500—an event that featured more than 65 lead changes that were shared between 17 different drivers.

Redbull, Ferrari, Part Ways with Formula One Teams Association & Other Racing News

Two lead sponsors of the overseeing body of regulation that helps to keep the Formula One Sport on track, FOTA, have announced that they will be parting ways with it in 2012. Both Ferrari and Redbull have announced that they will not be returning to the Formula One Team Association in the years that follow. The news is particularly daunting because Redbull won the Constructors’ championship in 2010 and in 2011.

Ferrari issued a simple statement regarding their departure from this body on December 2nd, stating that, “FOTA’s drive has run its course.”

Rumors are widely spurring that the Resource Restriction Agreement, which would have introduced a sport-wide spending cap to keep the nature of the sport more competitive, was to blame. But that’s probably not the truth, because this agreement was first put into place by Luca di Montezemolo, who was CEO of Ferrari at the time.

The organization has been holding meetings to determine its best path forwards in 2012.

Other Racing News:

  • Bernie Ecclestone, the head of Formula One, has announced a deadline extension for the United States Grand Prix, slated for Nov. 18, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The World Motor Sport Council is expected to confirm the 2012 calendar this month. Mr. Ecclestone emphasized that adequate funding needs to be in place for the races to happen.
  • Sprint Cup will remain Sprint Cup. Sources have confirmed to the press that NASCAR has reached a new three year deal with Sprint, extending the name of the cup through 2016.
  • Newman/Haas Racing, which was created by actor Paul Newman, has announced that they will NOT have an IndyCar team in 2012 due to financial calamity. In a recent statement that issued to the press, co-founder, Carl Haas, told the New York Times that,
    “The economic climate no longer enables Newman/Haas Racing to participate in open wheel racing at this time.”