Benny Parson’s Most Memorable Stock Car Racing Moments in His Own Words

Two decades of being a major league NASCAR driver netted Benny Parson more than $4 million in winnings, 21 victories, and the coveted 1973 Winston Cup championship, which he stated was nothing short of a miracle. Many of you have watched and enjoyed him announcing races on the popular EPSN network that covers them. Rarely, however, do you come across some seriously titillating information about one of the most legendary drivers to ever grace the track with his slick handling and coy composure in the cockpit. We managed to sift around a bit, and were able to dig up this awesome interview between Benny Parson and Stockcarracing.com.

Here are a few key highlights.

Parson says his biggest win – the 1973 Winston Cup championship – was nothing short of a miracle. “People who were in the garage at Rockingham for the October 21, 1973 race, when I miraculously won my first and only Winston Cup championship, still tell me they experienced one of the most dramatic hours in racing,” Parson told SCR of that dramatic event that led up to his most noteworthy race.

After basically totaling his car, roll bars and all, Parson was getting ready to call it a day and leave the track, when someone on his team suggested that they modify the car to make it race-ready again by removing the roll bars. He would not get back on the track for more than an hour, during the 136th lap. He would finish 28th in that race, but it still gave him the point edge to win the cup that year.

His most memorable thrill is Daytona. “Daytona 500 and gave me the biggest thrill of my racing career,” Parson told SCR.

He never thought he was as good at driving on dirt tracks as Richard Petty was. Rehashing a famous mishap that took place at the dirt track on the Raleigh North, Carolina Fairgrounds in 1970, Parson still attributes Richard Petty as a better dirt track driver in his interview with SCR.“Just as I came off Turn 4 and prepared to pitch the car into Turn 1, the engine blew. So I still don’t know if I could have driven on dirt like Richard Petty, doggone it,” he said.